Glamorized Jobs: the “Sexy Bartender”

coyote ugly

So I know I’ve explained earlier that I bartend, and have been doing it for about 3 years now (to some, I’m still an amateur, and I’m ok with that).  And based on my experience, although limited, I’ve seen the glamorization that comes with the job.  For some reason, bartenders are automatically really cool people.  The bartender handles alcohol, is knowledgeable about alcohol, and presents a welcoming personality for the crowd they are waiting on.  Along with all that, it is a customer service position, and it is usually a position filled by someone a bit more outgoing, experienced in life, and easily to talk to.  These are all traits that can obviously seem very attractive to the bar attendees.

However, I still find it very baffling that, regardless of the environment, the bartender comes off as far more alluring than that particular person would be if they were not tending bar.  And this could be alluring in a sexual manner, in a dangerous way, or just an exciting curiosity.  Nevertheless, the bartender is has suddenly elevated in a level of attraction.

I’ve bartended for bars, clubs, strip clubs, restaurants, and catering companies.  You can say I’ve been around a majority of different environments that bartenders would be present.  And, in every single situation, there was not a single shift that went by where I wasn’t talked to by someone with greater interest than is necessary.  This either led to a lengthy conversation about my background, an asking for my phone number, or a questioning of my relationship status.

Now…what leads people to do this?  I’m a moderately attractive woman, no Coyote Ugly chicka, but I have been hit on in random, daily situations on occasion.  But, this never happens nowhere near as often as while I’m working.  When I’m bartending, it’s as if suddenly I turned into Jennifer Lawrence and all eyes on me, when before I walked in the room unnoticed.

With all this, I guess it’s just being in a position of serving alcohol while trying to seem appealing to others.  All the while, working in a position that has been sexualized by media.  Look at receptionists, air stewards, housekeepers, and many others that have fallen in the same stereotype: a female in a position of service and willing to be taken advantage of.  (And, before I go further, I understand this pertains to men in the same situation, but I’m female, so that’s what I go with at first, sorry.)  This creates this allure of being open to anything and everything…at your service.

As much as I love bartending, and still enjoy most of the interactions I have with my customers and co-workers, this never-ending glamorization still bothers and confuses me.  It doesn’t help either that my cousin, a single, older male, wants to become a bartender to meet women, even though he’s had the same secure job for years.  Great, not like people do it for an actual living or anything.

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From Bartender to Office Rep..what now?

It’s been exactly 1 year and 6 days since I walked across the stage and picked up my Bachelor’s Degree from AU.  It took me this long to finally land a full time job.  Not just any job, an adult job, with benefits and all.  I was bartending a wedding two nights ago and tried to imagine how I’d feel going to an office each day and sitting down for 8 hours.  Sitting is something I don’t usually do, especially while I make money, so this will be quite a challenge.

Also, I’m moving from Chicago to Denver by the end of next month, so if anyone has advice on that, let me know.

It seems scary to think that I’ll build a monotonous routine with this job eventually.  I mean, to be honest, it will be a struggle.  I’m used to moving around, talking to people, making jokes, making drinks, cleaning things, eating good food, and building and breaking things down.  How can I go from that to taking phone calls in an office?  It’s hard to imagine, but hey, I want to do it.  At least for now, I do.

I just hope that my forcing myself into this lifestyle of “young professional” doesn’t waste the young years in my life when I can be out exploring the world.  I don’t want to have to wait till I’m 65 to do that.  No one should.

So, in conclusion, I’m done ranting about being a young unemployed bartender, and will probably start eventually ranting about being the “young professional” I’m expected to be.  I’ve been wanting this for so long, but now that it’s here, it’s kind of terrifying.